COVID-19 Symptom Checker as desktop web app & tables

You can see how likely you are to have COVID-19 by looking at the following 2 evidence-based tables on the characteristics and symptoms of COVID-19 compared to flu and cold.

Based on the incidence data you can already see that in general the probability of a cold is 115 times higher and a flu 3 times higher than the probability of COVID-19, provided you have not had contact with an infected person. The probability of COVID-19 compared to influenza continues to decrease sharply if your symptoms appeared suddenly.

Numbers in brackets are references to the source of the data in the footnotes. Numbers in blue are linked to the source of the data.

The %-number of symptoms in the following table indicates how many of 100 sick patients statistically have this symptom.

If you have one of the 14 COVID-19 symptoms in the table reported by the
WHO, you can compare the 3 %-numbers of your symptom for the 3 diseases. The disease with the highest %-number of this symptom is then more likely to be present if this symptom is present. If this symptom never occurs with flu or cold, they are excluded.
 
For an accurate calculation of the probabilities of the 3 diseases compared to each other in the presence of your symptoms, you can also use the BETA version of our free "COVID-19 Checker" app, which you can
use as an Android app or as a desktop web-app (enter "COVID-19 check" as symptom).

Request a doctor's note and/or a test order if you have a COVID-19 symptom or even if you have no symptoms but have been in a COVID-19 risk state or have been in contact with an infected person:

(a) = 23,626 (=number of new cases in USA per day, 4/21/2020) x 365 divided by 328 Mio. (US population)
(0) https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/who-china-joint-mission-on-covid-19-final-report.pdf page 12
(1) Prakash S. Bisen,Ruchika Raghuvanshi: Emerging Epidemics: Management and Control, p. 422; Laine/Goldmann: In the Clinic: Practical Information about Common Health Problems, 2009, p. 153
(2) Prakash S. Bisen,Ruchika Raghuvanshi: Emerging Epidemics: Management and Control, p. 422; Laine/Goldmann: In the Clinic: Practical Information about Common Health Problems, 2009, p. 153
(3) Laine/Goldmann: In the Clinic: Practical Information about Common Health Problems, 2009, p. 153
(4) Walter Haas; Influenza: Prävention, Diagnostik, Therapie und öffentliche Gesundheit, 2009
(5) Laine/Goldmann: In the Clinic: Practical Information about Common Health Problems, 2009, p. 153
(6) Prakash S. Bisen,Ruchika Raghuvanshi: Emerging Epidemics: Management and Control, p. 422; Laine/Goldmann: In the Clinic: Practical Information about Common Health Problems, 2009, p. 153)
(7) Laine/Goldmann: In the Clinic: Practical Information about Common Health Problems, 2009, p. 153
(8) Prakash S. Bisen,Ruchika Raghuvanshi: Emerging Epidemics: Management and Control, p. 422; Laine/Goldmann: In the Clinic: Practical Information about Common Health Problems, 2009, p. 153
(9) Prakash S. Bisen,Ruchika Raghuvanshi: Emerging Epidemics: Management and Control, p. 422
(10) Laine/Goldmann: In the Clinic: Practical Information about Common Health Problems, 2009, p. 153
(11) Prakash S. Bisen,Ruchika Raghuvanshi: Emerging Epidemics: Management and Control, p. 422

COVID-19 Symptom Checker

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